Archive | May, 2014

News roundup: a bumper edition with festivals, blog tours, new best-sellers and more!

31 May

Here is the  late news:

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Things are hotting up in the events calendar and it’s looking like a great year for catching your favourite authors.

bold books logoWe’re in the final stretch in the run-up to the Bold Strokes Nottingham Festival on the 7th and 8th of June. The Bold Strokes UK blog has been hosting posts by authors attending the event.

Cari Hunter kicked things off with a post about coming home to Britain. After running around the US in Desolation Point and Tumbledown, she’s glad to be back in her home Peak District for her fourth novel No Good Reason.

Amy Dunne followed up with a post about being really bloody excited about the Nottingham Festival and why everyone should go. She’s had a big year with her debut Secret Lies being a Goldie finalist and working on two more novels which weren’t even a twinkle in her eye this time last year.

Andrea Bramhall talks about her new novel Nightingale – a story about an British Muslim woman forced to choose between love and her family. Andrea talks about the reality faced by women in less tolerant cultures and countries, and their harsh treatment.

And last, for this week, is Lesley Davis who likes her leading ladies. She talks about what it is that captures her attention in heroines on TV and in her own novels.

It’s a fab and free event in a great city, definitely recommended.  And you may find the odd indie author lurking in the audience.

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paulburston

Paul Burston by Krystyna FitzGerald-Morris

Down south that same weekend is a pop-up Polari at the Stoke Newington Literary Festival. Paul Burston will be hosting the panel which includes the wonderful VG Lee. You can get tickets here. For a taster of what the Polari events are like you can read an account by Jon Dolores of last Monday’s event with Veronica Fearon. Pictures here.

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lfest

 

The lineup for L Fest was also announced this week. As well as bands, caberet and fun workshops, there’s a great group of authors going this year. On the Creating Chemistry panel are best-selling indie authors Jade Winters, Clare Lydon and Clare Ashton with the session hosted by the bestest selling of them all Kiki Archer. VG Lee will be holding writing workshops and Bold Strokes authors are also out in force this year with Andrea Bramhall, Amy Dunne, Crin Claxton, Gill McKnight and I. Beacham. US authors Cindy Rizzo and Justine Saracen will also be there.

This is another great event. Well worth the money with all that’s on offer and just the fabulousness of sitting in a field with so many lesbians.

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Onto new books and upcoming releases.

stars collideGoldie finalist HP Munro has just released Stars Collide and it’s had a stellar start hitting the number one spot on Amazon pretty much everywhere. Here’s the enticing cover and blurb:

It’s tough growing up in the spotlight and Freya Easter has had to do just that, being part of the Conor family, who are Hollywood acting royalty, has meant that every aspect of her family’s life has been played out in the spotlight. Despite her own fame Freya has managed to keep one aspect of her life out of the public eye, however, a new job on hit show Front Line and a storyline that pairs her with the gorgeous Jordan Ellis, may mean that Freya’s secret is about to come out.

In a world of glitz and glamor, Jordan Ellis has come to the conclusion that all that glitters is not gold. She has become disillusioned with relationships and is longing for a deeper connection, and is surprised when it comes in the form of the most unexpected package.

Whilst their on screen counterparts begin a romantic journey, Freya and Jordan find themselves on a similar pathway.

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amazonia_impossible_choiceAnother Goldie finalist, Sky Croft, has revealed the cover and blurb for her forthcoming novel Amazonia: An Impossible Choice. It’s the follow up to Amazonia and will be available in August. Here’s the blurb:

A year after the events in Amazonia, Blake and Shale are preparing for their upcoming joining ceremony. A few days after celebrating their union, a savage storm hits the Amazon village, unearthing a long lost secret – a clue to the location of a sacred relic, which was once stolen from the Amazon tribe. Accompanied by Kale and Amber, Blake and Shale set out on a quest to reclaim the treasured artefact. Away from the safety of their village, the four women encounter thieves, deadly foes, and predatory animals. Their search leads them underground to a vast cave system, where darkness is a constant enemy, and one mistake in the perilous terrain could mean death.

As echoes from the past come back to haunt them, Blake and Kale are both put into life-threatening situations. With only time to save one, Shale is faced with an impossible choice–her wife or her twin? Who will she choose?

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theempath_lgJody Klaire‘s The Empath is also out this summer. She is very keen for you to meet the heroine from her story. She’s written a short prequel so you can get to know her. You can find the teaser here.

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Things have been busy in the blogosphere this week with the writing process blog hop and the Lesbian Reading Room interviews with Goldie finalists.

catsCari Hunter talked about writing her sequel to the forthcoming No Good Reason. In this series I’m very excited to see that Cari’s bringing the thriller and adventure elements of her writing to the fore. Here’s what she says about her foray into the crime genre:

I prefer to write regular women, women you could bump into on the street and have a laugh with, so even though the case in No Good Reason is horrific, there’s plenty of humour as well, which is not particularly in keeping with the genre. Many mainstream crime novels have po-faced leads, but in my experience the people working in emergency services laugh more often than they cry, and I want my writing to reflect that.

Cari’s blogs are always entertaining. Have a read of her writing process too for the familiar phases of “self doubt”, “procrastination” and “the hissy fit” here.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnother hugely entertaining lady is Suzanne Egerton who also answered the writing process questions. Her work in progress has the 1970s London as its backdrop with its cultural and fashion highs and police corruption and gang land lows.

Nina is initially shy and has been brought up to assume that her husband knows best. She is still grieving for the baby she miscarried. Georgie is a fun, flirty girl who would love to have swung through the sixties, but she is sole carer and provider for her mother, an ailing ex-actress with whom she lives in a grim, draughty flat; there is never enough money. The lives of Nina and Georgie change utterly when they start work at the casino; its tawdry glamour has a transformative effect. Plenty happens as the girls experience a new sense of freedom, enjoy friendships, party, mix and match, and see a darker side of Swinging London.

For inspiration and her unique take on things, Suzanne casually drops in “My own ten years of experiences as a croupier and later a pit boss have been a huge source of inspiration,” and “I have spent many a late hour labouring over an engraving machine, inscribing sports trophies, or tokens of love; I have cleaned toilets, worked in a factory, sold door-to-door. I have committed crime. A great education for a writer.

I’m keeping my eyes peeled for this one – it sounds excellent. Here’s the full piece. You can also find Suzanne’s tips for readings here too.

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PopeJoan

Free this weekend!

Rachel Dax has been at it too. She’s currently working on part 3 of The Legend of Pope Joan trilogy:

In this novel Joan reaches the pinnacle of her journey and becomes Pope. Her existence is precarious but equally invigorating and addictive. She has immense power yet at the same time is more vulnerable and isolated than ever before and this only leads to more danger.

Of her writing process she says:

Usually I will get an idea or image that totally consumes me and then I start writing. The first part of the writing process is like a giant vomit. I just spew it out and get the key story or plot points/images on ‘paper’ and then after that, I work towards making it into a complete work.

The Legend Of Pope Joan, Part 2. Athens has been nominated for a Goldie Award in the Historical Fiction category.You can have a taster of this unique trilogy for FREE by downloading part 1 this weekend.

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Goldie finalists Amy Dunne and Andrea Bramhall have been answering questions at the Lesbian Reading Room. The set questions ask authors about their favourite books, inspiration, support, their next work and what it means to them to be a Goldie finalist.

swordfishFor her work-in-progress Andrea notes that “The inspiration for [The Chameleon] came from the BSB UK event last year. I was talking to a lady from South Africa and she was drinking a glass of wine. The idea struck me of writing a story set in the vineyards of the Western Cape. Exploring the themes and idea’s that have affected me a great deal since I spent a portion of my childhood in South Africa in the eighties. When opposition to Apartheid was at it’s highest and the world was watching…But the idea for my latest proposal for a novel, set in a coastal village in the UK, came from one of the women in my village threatening to shoot her neighbours cat because it was hunting birds in her garden.”

Andrea is “currently researching for The Chameleon, and working on the proposal for Collide-O-Scope (with the crazy village cat lady), but up next publication wise is Swordfish due to be published in January 2015.”

season's meetingsFor Amy,  “Season’s Meetings is up next for publication. It’s due to be released this December coming. I can’t wait to share it with everyone. I’m already counting down the weeks and trying not to dwell on the prospect of the hardcore editing that’s fast approaching.

My wife and I are huge fans of Christmas. We love everything about it. As soon as December 1st arrives we’re decorating out house without a hint of hesitation. It’s a time for family, laughter, fun, indulgence, and love. I tried to incorporate all of things we love into the story and I had an absolute blast writing it.

Here are the full interviews for Amy and Andrea.

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Finally a quick look at reviews.

playing my loveAngela Peach‘s very popular Playing My Love was reviewed over on Girl Guide London. Here’s what they had to say about the story with two endings that has intrigued readers:

Playing my Love is certainly a tender novel full of romance but also some laughs, and characters that made me read the whole book through in one sitting – I literally couldn’t put it down. The rocky journey of the two main characters, both holding back their feelings from each other, is an equally gripping story-line… Playing my Love is a great read, perfect for any holidays you’ve got planned lazing on the beach, or cheering up your afternoon on a rainy day

You can read the full review here.

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that certain somethingAnd since I was a bit of a useless arse this week and did the news late, I missed the opportunity to tell you about my chat with Beni Gee on the VLR last night. It was terribly good, you should have been there. So instead, I better tell you about some reviews of That Certain Something by people with impeccable taste. These are the best reviews I’ve ever had so you’re not going to get away without hearing about them 🙂

The Velvet Lounger over on the Lesbian Reading Room had this to say:

Clare Ashton has written another winner. That Certain Something was a joy to read from start to finish. It warms your heart, tickles your fancy and captivates your mind…You will be captivated, entertained and fall in love, all while belly laughing your way through Pia’s bare-arsed antics

And TT Thomas also said “Ashton’s writing is smooth as glass in this one, and yet manages to layer texture, tone and timing into a love story that would burn down Londontown if it got any hotter! There’s not a misstep in this wonderful novel, unless you count your own as you bump into walls while reading because you can’t put it down! Read That Certain Something, and then give a copy to someone you like…you know, in that way.

Huzzah!

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News Roundup: New Blogs from Clare Ashton & RJ Samuel, Interviews with Stella Duffy & Emma Donoghue, Kiki Archer Gets Her Tatts Out, & Much More!

22 May

After Tig copped lucky with a quiet spell last week, the recent sunshine seems to have made this week’s news fairly blossom. There’s loads of it to catch up on, so slap on some sun cream, and enjoy…

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V.A FearonIf the fine weather has you hankering after a night out in the Big Smoke but you’re stuck for entertainment ideas, VA Fearon and Sarah Westwood (AKA  The Rubbish Lesbian) will be appearing at Polari on May 27th. Tickets are £5 and you can book them here.

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that certain somethingThe Writing Processes Blog Hop continues apace, with Clare Ashton copping a tag from VG Lee and subsequently posting her entry, in which she chats a little about the inspiration behind her current best seller That Certain Something:

It was sparked by a conversation on the VLR discussion group where I was larking about answering questions for one of their spot-on weekends. Someone found my answers entertaining and fun and asked if my novels were the same. I had to respond that actually they were rather angst-ridden and miserable, so it had me wondering why on earth wasn’t I writing something humorous?

And goes on to reveal how she actually begins to put pen to paper:

A lot of that daydreaming at first. Playing with the glimmerings of a plot, characters and themes. I start jotting down bits of dialogue that I keep hearing in my head and ideas for scenes in a new Moleskin notepad for each book…

To read the full blog, hop over here.

RJ Samuel reading on FridayRJ Samuel also got nabbed and provided some insight into the influences behind her novels:

I don’t really write by genre. I write the story I need to tell, and everyone’s story is different. I draw from my diverse background as an Indian, born in Nigeria, living for many years in Ireland, and with all my family in America. From my educational and career background as a doctor, an IT person, a restaurant/bar owner, a writer. Even from my brief experiences in summer jobs as chambermaid, inventory clerk, pizza cutter, physiotherapy assistant, flower-stall ‘manager’.

Click here to read the rest of RJ’s answers.

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Stella Duffy, writer, actorWe’ve found a couple of interviews with Stella Duffy to catch up on. In a lively feature in The Guardian this weekend, Stella hopped through a multitude of topics covering family, work, cancer, and Nigel Farage (to name but a few).

Nigel Farage is probably fun to have a drink with, which is a problem. Some people might think: “Working class, lesbian, left wing – ugh!”, but they’d find I’m fun to have a drink with. Without space for dialogue, there’s no reconciliation.

And while I was hunting down the link for that chat, I came across another piece from the British Council in April that we somehow managed to overlook – never let it be said that we’re infallible! In Brussels to debate the concept of a national literature, Stella had this to say on the topic:

“The idea of there being a British national literature sort of confuses me anyway, making it ripe for a good discussion! The range of people in Britain is amazingly interesting – rather than there being a particular ‘national identity’, there are so many different ‘national identities’. One of the reasons the different regions of the UK are so important is because they didn’t used to speak the same language. There’s an incredible diversity in dialogue which comes through in prose, which is one of the things that makes British writing so exciting.”

You can read the full text of both interviews by hitting the links.

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FrogMusicMeanwhile, Emma Donoghue has been Making Beautiful Music over at Lambda Literary, where she chats about Frog Music, the rise of queer literature, and her quandary over whether to kick off her writing career with Stir Fry or Hood:

I think that what I would say is that I was entirely wrong. I remember my editor talking me down. I rung her up to say, Stir Fry’s really immature and shallow, it won’t work!
She said to me, “Emma, lots of people are going to prefer
Stir Fry,” and she was entirely right. It sold much better. Clearly, it’s not that I was insecure in general—I wasn’t—I just had this feeling that Hood was much stronger stuff. I would still say it is, I would say it’s a far better book. But readers need all sorts of things from their books.

Click the first link up there to read the entire piece.

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HanselGretalIf you’re a better woman than I am (not difficult!) and one of the 186.9 million people who understand what the hell Tumblr is all about, you can join Niamh Murphy over there on her brand new page. There are handy links to each of Niamh’s books and to the reading she recently posted from Mask of the Highway Woman. For those of you who aren’t so down with the kids and remain befuddled, head here, where WikiP will make everything as clear as mud.

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Kiki-ArcherKiki Archer has been getting her tatts out (quite literally) for all those lesbians who might struggle with the tricky concept of letting a potential love interest know that they too are a big old friend of Dorothy. In five handy steps, you can learn how to drop hints, let the cat out of the bag, and if all else fails, flash a bit of tatt. For Kiki’s How To guide, click here.

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nightingaleA couple of reviews now to wind up the week, both for Andrea Bramhall‘s Nightingale, and both resoundingly enthusiastic:

The Lesbian Reading Room had this to say:

Nightingale is an amazing and sometimes brutal tale of the fate of women forced into arranged marriages and abducted by their husband’s family to places where western law and western agencies cannot reach them. At the same time it is a wonderful romance that tells the tale of two women who’s souls connect from the very first day and are destined to love each other despite their separation.

While over at Rainbow Book Reviews:

This multi-tiered story with a hot and sexy love story, an extremely exciting intense military-like task force operation marvelously intertwined with a host of outstanding supporting characters makes this book a wonderfully balanced and supremely entertaining read. I easily give this my highest recommendation. Truly, not to be missed!

As a Lambda finalist, Andrea also took part in an ongoing Q&A blog spot at the Lesbian Reading Room, where she chats about finding the inspiration for her novels, what the nomination means to her, and what’s up next.

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Righto, that’s me done for the week. Apologies to my neighbours, but I’m getting my shorts on!

News roundup: VG Lee on writing, interviews with Kiki Archer, and more with Niamh Murphy, Clare Ashton, Lesley Davis and Val McDermid

16 May

Is it me, or is it quiet this week? If it is just me, then let me know what I missed. Here’s what I didn’t, and very nice it is too:

VGLeeFabulous VG Lee has been taking part in the Writing Process Blog Tour. VG’s short and entertaining piece talks about how her writing process works (“By pauses, leaps and bounds.”) and her current novel Mr Oliver that she originally started over 20 years ago:

“I have always returned to Mr Oliver – his life and loves. The story is set in the 1970’s and moves between London and Yorkshire. It is about obsessive love and how it can ruin a life or many lives. As in all my work, tragedy is closely linked to comedy, which I feel is an ideal combination.”

You can read the rest of the piece here on a Facebook note (requires you to be logged into Facebook).

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PLayinginshadowLesley Davis revealed the cover for her next book Playing in Shadow. Here’s what a very pleased Lesley had to say about it:

“I would like to announce my next book from Bold Strokes Books, “Playing In Shadow’, now has this gorgeous cover to grace it! This is a spin off to ‘Playing Passion’s Game’ so fans of Trent….she’s back! She’s brought friends along so I hope you’ll enjoy meeting Bryce and Scarlet. Gamers, gays, and Goths unite!”

Playing in Shadow is due for release in 2015.

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KikiDivaKiki Archer was interviewed in Diva magazine and G3 this week. In the G3 interview she talks about the possibility of another book to follow her new and already best-selling When You Know. She also lets us in on the inspiration for the bathroom scene in the first book One Foot Onto the Ice and her plans for moving into film.

As a highly successful indie author, Kiki talked to Diva magazine about how publishing is changing and the impact of social media on book sales. She talks about her popular video logs and other ways the UK indie authors reach readers through non-traditional ways. Have a gander over here for some tips.

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Niamh Murphy has been busy on her current work in progress The Lady Edris and the Kingdom in a Cave – chapter 5 is now available for review on Wattpad. She has also uploaded her first reading, this time of her debut novel Mask of the Highwaywoman. You can see it here.

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valmcdermidIf you’re in Edinburgh next week, you can catch Val McDermid answering questions and reading from her Lambda finalist Cross and Burn. She will be appearing at the Central Library on Thursday 22nd May and you can book tickets here!

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that certain somethingFinally, that Clare Ashton got her book out at last. That Certain Something is out on Amazon and Smashwords. (It’s terribly good you know, have a peek at the sample, it’s got lesbians in it and everything.)

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Until next time, ta ra!

 

News Roundup: New Novels from Clare Ashton & Catherine Hall, Kiki Archer in Curve, Andrea Bramhall on “Why?”, Reviews & More…

8 May

As we break out the bunting, sequins, fireworks, and ripaway skirts for Eurovision this weekend, let’s take a moment out of the preparations to see what the UK LesFic writers have been up to…

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No matter how many “null points” the Brit entry scores on Saturday, our very own Clare Ashton will still have quite a bit to celebrate with her third novel That Certain Something set for release later this month. Taking a step away from the dark and twisty After Mrs Hamilton, Clare has gone for light-hearted rom-com with That Certain Something, and we have the blurb and rather lovely cover right here:

that certain somethingLove or money? Follow the head or heart? Pia and Cate seem to be flip sides of a coin. But when they meet, they definitely have that certain something, and these questions aren’t so simple after a night like theirs.

Pia Benitez-Smith has a head full of ideals and romance, much to her mother’s distress. She’s a young photojournalist out to prove herself and although not accident prone, trouble certainly finds her. On one such troublesome day, she literally falls into the arms of the beautiful Cate. Elegant, intriguing and well-spoken, Cate appears the polar opposite of Pia. When the two banter about the importance of love versus money, Cate claims that her perfect night will always be expensive. Working-class Pia can’t resist this challenge and with the aid of a beguiling summer night in London, she begins to enchant her new friend.

An irresistible couple, a charismatic city, a priceless supporting cast – That Certain Something is a sparkling romance from Goldie award winner Clare Ashton.

Clare has given the novel a release date of “Oh God, some time in May” (or words to that effect) so keep your eye on the news and the New & Upcoming Releases page for further information.

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BSB-AndreaBramhallLgFor those of you who entered our recent contest to win a copy of Andrea Bramhall‘s latest release Nightingale, the winner – who correctly answered that Hazaar means Nightingale in Arabic – was CJ Wightman. Congrats CJ and a big thank you to everyone who participated.

Andrea has also been blogging at Women and Words, answering a question that she has apparently faced quite a few times in the past months: Why?

That seems to be the general question when I talk to anyone about Nightingale. Why write a story like this? Why write about a Muslim girl falling in love with a white girl? Why do I think I’m qualified to write this story when I’m not Muslim and haven’t been in a relationship with a Muslim girl? Why write a story that has so much darkness to it? Why write this story?

If you want to know her answers, head to this link.

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Glum about missing out on a free book? Well sulk no more because Niamh Murphy has posted a further two chapters of her short story The Lady Edris and the Kingdom in a Cave over at Wattpad. The story, which is closing in on its finale, is completely free to read, and you can catch up with all of the chapters by clicking here.

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Kiki-264Hopping across the pond for a moment now, as Curve Magazine has been chatting to Kiki Archer about her fifth bestselling novel, and her plans for the future (clue: she’s about to embark on a screenwriting course). On the secret to her success, she has this to say:

I think I’m easy to relate to for a lot of lesbians. I’m a working mum with a wife and two young children. I don’t pretend to have the most important job in the work. My writing is a hobby which I fit around what actually IS the most important job in the world – being a mum. I’m easily accessible on social media and I think readers like the fact they can contact me freely, even if just to say they’ve enjoyed my latest book.

The full interview is available here.

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the repercussionsAn early heads up about a new novel from Catherine Hall  – author of Days of Grace and The Proof of Love, which won the prestigious Green Carnation prize in 2011. Her third novel, The Repercussionswill be released by Portobello books on September 25th, and its blurb goes like this:

When war photographer Jo returns from her latest assignment in Afghanistan and moves into the Brighton flat she’s just inherited, she hopes to restore equilibrium to her chaotic life. But images and events of her recent past and the reading of her great-grandmother Elizabeth’s diary haunt her night and day, forcing Jo to come to terms with demons she thought she could leave behind.

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clare lydonClosing out this week with a review round-up!

First up, the Lesbian Reading Room has been taking a peek at Clare Lydon‘s London Calling:

But for me what makes this stand out head and shoulders is the comedy. It is quintessentially British, a tale of minor disasters which constantly derail Jess’s hopes without being too heavy. Our heroine has to work to get out from one thing after another. The farce is clever and witty – hugely entertaining and a joyous read.

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cover_hearts-and-flowers-borderMeanwhile, Terry Baker has been very busy with the Brits. She had this to say about the recent reissue of L.T. Smith‘s Hearts and Flowers Border:

I read this book years ago and really enjoyed it. I was so pleased to see that it has been re-published and is now available in ebook. LT Smith is an accomplished writer. Her books are a delight to read and her wit and humor is wonderful.
This is an easy and comfortable read. The story is told from Laura’s point of view and follows through from her teens and her first love through to adulthood. There is a melting pot full of emotions running rife throughout, with a lot of intense drama and angst both from the teenage Laura and Emma through to the adult Laura and Emma. But, there is a lot of laughter too.

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Terry has also reviewed Grace Falls by H.P. Munro:

grace fallsThis is the first book I’ve read by H.P. Munro. I have to say, it won’t be the last as I thoroughly enjoyed it. The story is a true delight to read. The two main characters, Maddie and Alex are so obviously made for each other. Both are multi-faceted with a fantastic back up cast of secondary characters all interacting wonderfully well together to progress the story forward.

And Jade Winters’ Say Something:

Each of her books are so very different. This book is about bullying and the consequences of a person being bullied. Not only bullying in schools amongst children and teens, but bullying within the work place. It happens far too often. Jade has portrayed these cases with knowledge, care and understanding. She has obviously researched the subject very well. Jade has picked a tough subject to write about, she’s done it extremely well and fearlessly.

You can find the full text of all those reviews by hitting each link.

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Right that’s me done. Don’t suppose anyone knows where I can buy a feather boa, a glow-in-the-dark tiara, and a rara skirt?

multi_colour_fea_4cf4014fb9b30

 

 

 

News roundup: Polari fun, new author Emma Rose Millar, Goldie finalists, Manda Scott and more!

2 May

It’s a soggy start to May, so put your feet up and read all about the latest UK lesbian fiction news:

PolariEvening2

Polari lineup: Kiki Archer, La JohnJoseph, Rebecca Chance, Sophie Ward, Philip Hensher, hosted by Paul Burston. Copyright Krystyna FitzGerald-Morris http://krysphotos.co.uk/

This month’s Polari evening in London looked like a fabulous event. The evening was kicked off by Kiki Archer reading from her best-seller One Foot Onto The Ice to a great reception from the audience.

Actress Sophie Ward also read from her short non-fiction book A Marriage Proposal – a considered argument in favour of equal marriage (the Guardian short is available on Amazon here).

You can read an account of the whole evening by Helen Smith and see videos of Kiki reading from One Foot Onto The Ice and When You Know on youtube. More fab photos of the evening are also available here.

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StainsA new author to the UKLesFic list now. Emma Rose Millar is an historical fiction writer. Two of her short stories were published in the Sunkissed anthology by Freya and her first novel Strains from an Aeolian Harp set in the 1920s made it to the final rounds of the Chaucer Awards. The novel was reviewed by When Sally Met Sally when it was first published:

Strains from an Aeolian Harp is a compelling tale of domestic violence, infidelity and drug-addiction, but also one of courage and hope; a journey of self-discovery and a story of love between women which transcends brutality and cruelty… Full of engaging characters, complex relationships, seedy locations and spine-chilling twists and turns, this is a brilliantly written novel which is sure to keep you hooked.”

Emma is in the late stages of writing Five Guns Blazing, a story of three female pirates, and has also started her third novel The Frendinnen, a two-parter based on the painting by Gustav Klimt of the same name. You can find more details on her blog.

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manda-scottManda Scott has been blogging about creativity, story-telling and all its forms:

“Been thinking a lot recently about creativity, about the process of writing, about creativity, about what it is and why we do it… and how. How is it that we make black marks on a white page/screen and create whole worlds in the minds of others”

She also talks a little about her work in progress that is very different from her  previous books. Here’s the link to the post.

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Nicola Griffith‘s Hild has been out six months but is still garnering praise and great reviews. Nicola reports that there are fewer interviews, a good thing having Book 2 to get on with, but there’s still enough related to Book 1 to warrant roundups. Here’s the roundup link to catch up with the latest reviews and news on Hild, including making the shortlist for Bisexual Book Awards.

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JodyKlaireWith the summer release of her début novel The Empath creeping steadily closer, Jody Klaire has been blogging about why she chose to write a series rather than a standalone story:

Series give the reader a chance to witness the characters grow, we aren’t just dropping in on them during a period of their lives and moving on. In a series we get to really know them on every level, we witness them change, grow, regress, break and rebuild. You love the character, you look forward to seeing them again, they become part of you, part of your life and maybe, if the writing is really good, they become a fond friend.

You can read the full piece at this link.

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secretliesTerry Baker reviewed Goldie finalist Secret Lies by Amy Dunne. This is what Terry had to say:

“This is Amy Dunne’s debut book and she is off to a flying start in the world of lesbian fiction. She’s shown she can pen a good book on extremely difficult topics. Abuse, self harm, homophobia and two inexperienced young women embarking on their first lesbian romance together, comprises just a small part of this well written and researched story.”

You can read the full review here.

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A quick reminder now about the Andrea Bramhall giveaway of her new novel Nightingale. Pop over to the guest post that she did for us earlier in the week and answer her question before Monday.

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GCLS clean logoAnd finally, a great big congratulations to UKLesFic’s Cari Hunter whose excellent thriller Desolation Point has made the Goldie short list! She is joined by another Brit Sky Croft with Mountain Rescue: The Ascent in the Romantic Suspense/Intrigue/Adventure category. Very well done and good luck folks! All of the finalists are listed here and winners are announced at the GCLS conference in July.