News roundup: A pair of new authors, a plethora of reviews, a couple of readings and more!

4 Apr

It’s not so much a pea-souper outside, more a light chicken broth, but if you’re inside avoiding the smog now’s a good time to catch up with some reading and two more UK lesfic writers:

JodyKlaireWelsh Jody Klaire is a new writer at publisher Bedazzled Ink. Previous careers have been all sorts from police officer to singer. It is unknown whether she has combined the uniform of the former while performing the latter in any capacity, but I like to think she has. She lives with several furry animals, some out of choice. Her debut The Empath is due out this summer. Here’s the blurb and pretty cover:

theempath_lgBlessed and cursed with the ability to sense the feelings, past, and future of those around her, Aeron lived as a misfit child until she took the blame for the death of her best friend’s little brother when she was sixteen.

Released from the correctional facility, Aeron must go back to her hometown–the scene of the crime that no one in town has forgotten. But, Aeron must deal with more than just animosity. Someone in town is abducting and killing young girls, and with Aeron under suspicion, her distant father, the spectre of her Grandmother, and her psychiatrist–who is more than she appears–must all work together to figure out who’s invaded their town before it’s too late. Aeron must use the burdens that she has spent her life trying to hide to prove her innocence and save those taken.

karencampbell2A big welcome also to Karen Campbell a grumpy Scot who supports Arsenal (probably explains the grumpiness). Nirvana for Karen may be drinking Irn Bru, eating tattie scone and square sausage while listening to loud music. It is not known whether she is partial to furry animals but she definitely doesn’t like spiders.

violetHer novel, Violet’s Story, is a tale of a young lesbian in a mental hospital looking back on the events that led to her to being admitted. She also has a collection of short stories out now called Little Whispers. She has a new novel published by Austin Macauley this summer. The Knowing is part 1 of the Jen Keith trilogy.

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Cari Hunter readers will be over the moon to hear that Bold Strokes will be publishing her fourth novel and have also given her the go ahead to develop it into a series. No Good Reason sees Cari back on English turf in her favourite Derbyshire Peak District. Here’s a bit more about it from a giddy Ms Hunter.

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A quick run through reviews now.

treasure chestV.A. Fearon‘s gritty gangland novel The Girl with the Treasure Chest was reviewed by the Lesbian Reading Room.

This is the Veronica Fearon’s first novel and what an excellent start. Set in modern day London this is a gritty tale of love, loyalty and survival in the estates and the gangs that inhabit them. The tone, the settings, even the voices make this a novel very much of London.

The Lesbian Reading Room also reviewed Andrea Bramhall‘s Lambda finalist Clean Slate, an intriguing story of memory loss:

Andrea Bramall gets and holds your attention throughout this novel with multiple layers of suspense. Without giving any specific spoilers we spend our time wondering why Morgan did what she did, whether she will recover, how Morgan and Erin will cope, who is behind it all and then, when we have found out all of the above, we are still waiting for the other shoe to drop.

Ke Payne‘s YA novel Because of Her Review was reviewed by the The Fangirl:

Despite this being a Lesbian YA romance, this isn’t an “issues book.” Tabby’s sexual orientation is a fundamental part of her and her story, as it is with many LGBTQ people, but it’s not the sole plot point of the book. I cannot tell you how much of a relief it was to discover that this is really truly about Tabby’s life and love, not a angst tale about how lesbians’ are doomed to be heartbroken and alone.

FrogMusicFrog Music by Emma Donoghue was reviewed by Lambda:

This is Donoghue’s first full-length novel since her bestselling Room, and though the subject matter couldn’t be more dissimilar, Donoghue’s trademark language and curiosity about the seedier aspects of humanity are on full display…Call it a literary crime novel, call it historical fiction, call it lyric and engaging, Frog Music is in a category all its own.

This is Donoghue’s first full-length novel since her bestselling Room, and though the subject matter couldn’t be more dissimilar, Donoghue’s trademark language and curiosity about the seedier aspects of humanity are on full display. Though the story sags a little in the middle, this otherwise fast-paced mystery is a captivating exploration of female friendship, music, cultural clashes, San Francisco’s history, childcare, and the sex trade in the United States. Call it a literary crime novel, call it historical fiction, call it lyric and engaging, Frog Music is in a category all its own. – See more at: http://www.lambdaliterary.org/reviews/04/01/frog-music-by-emma-donoghue/#sthash.5trkchuk.dpuf
This is Donoghue’s first full-length novel since her bestselling Room, and though the subject matter couldn’t be more dissimilar, Donoghue’s trademark language and curiosity about the seedier aspects of humanity are on full display. Though the story sags a little in the middle, this otherwise fast-paced mystery is a captivating exploration of female friendship, music, cultural clashes, San Francisco’s history, childcare, and the sex trade in the United States. Call it a literary crime novel, call it historical fiction, call it lyric and engaging, Frog Music is in a category all its own. – See more at: http://www.lambdaliterary.org/reviews/04/01/frog-music-by-emma-donoghue/#sthash.5trkchuk.dpuf
This is Donoghue’s first full-length novel since her bestselling Room, and though the subject matter couldn’t be more dissimilar, Donoghue’s trademark language and curiosity about the seedier aspects of humanity are on full display. Though the story sags a little in the middle, this otherwise fast-paced mystery is a captivating exploration of female friendship, music, cultural clashes, San Francisco’s history, childcare, and the sex trade in the United States. Call it a literary crime novel, call it historical fiction, call it lyric and engaging, Frog Music is in a category all its own. – See more at: http://www.lambdaliterary.org/reviews/04/01/frog-music-by-emma-donoghue/#sthash.5trkchuk.dpuf

Planet of the Books reviewed See Right Through Me by L.T. Smith:

See Right Through Me by L.T. Smith is the book you’re looking for if you want to have a great time and laughter with an entertaining lesbian romance. It’s perfect for a holiday when you just want to relax and forget everything but the magic of love at first sight and read about human doubts and insecurities that can ruin everything.”

Nicola Griffith‘s Hild continues to get fabulous reviews – here’s a round up on Nicola’s blog. They include a review from Bisexual Books:

If you like historical epics with a leisurely pace and detailed world building, and your only complaint is that none of those books have queer protagonists, then Hild is for you.”

Clare Lydon‘s London Calling was reviewed by Terry Baker:

“This book is well written and edited, gripping, fast paced and a page turner from start to finish. It’s filled right to the brim with wonderful, multidimensional characters, glorious scenic descriptions of my home town, hilarity, family issues, loving and not so loving friends, there are even a couple of extra cute children to add to all the fun. A true melting pot full of authentic British dialogue and drama.”

And while we’re here, a reminder about the book flash for Clare’s London Calling on the online discussion group the Virtual Living Room this weekend. Clare will be answering questions on Sunday at 3 p.m. EDT. Click here to join this lesfic discussion group.

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hild coverSome nice extras now.

Emma Donoghue has provided an interactive map of locations for her latest book Frog Music. It shows 19th century San Francisco with snippets of information of venues from the novel. There’s also a playlist for the novel and almost all of the songs are available here.

Meanwhile L.T. Smith has been reading some of her republished work Hearts and Flowers Border. Scroll down to the bottom of the publisher’s page for the book to “Listen”.

Nicola Griffith has also been doing some readings for an interview and a great atmospheric reading from the middle of Hild is available here as a teaser.

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fakingitJade Winters has started a series of blogs about how she approaches writing a novel. This week she tells us how she starts her novel from initial idea, keeping focussed and inspired and stepping into the shoes of her heroines. She’s also posted the first chapter of her work in progress, Faking It. Take a look here.

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Finally, that Clare Ashton has been muttering about writing a light romance for an age, and she finally got her arse in gear and did it, or has nearly done it. That Certain Something is being polished and snipped at by an editor and is due out in May. In the meantime here’s Chapter 1 as a teaser.

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One Response to “News roundup: A pair of new authors, a plethora of reviews, a couple of readings and more!”

  1. Jody Klaire April 4, 2014 at 9:10 pm #

    Reblogged this on Jody Klaire and commented:
    Very exciting to be mentioned in the weekly news 😀

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